Function vs. Equation

By Jaxson

  • Equation

    In mathematics, an equation is a statement that asserts the equality of two expressions. The word equation and its cognates in other languages may have subtly different meanings; for example, in French an √©quation is defined as containing one or more variables, while in English any equality is an equation.Solving an equation containing variables consists of determining which values of the variables make the equality true. Variables are also called unknowns and the values of the unknowns that satisfy the equality are called solutions of the equation. There are two kinds of equations: identities and conditional equations. An identity is true for all values of the variable. A conditional equation is only true for particular values of the variables.An equation is written as two expressions, connected by a equals sign (“=”). The expressions on the two sides of the equals sign are called the “left-hand side” and “right-hand side” of the equation.

    The most common type of equation is an algebraic equation, in which the two sides are algebraic expressions.

    Each side of an algebraic equation will contain one or more terms. For example, the equation

    A

    x

    2

    +

    B

    x

    +

    C

    =

    y

    {displaystyle Ax^{2}+Bx+C=y}

    has left-hand side

    A

    x

    2

    +

    B

    x

    +

    C

    {displaystyle Ax^{2}+Bx+C}

    , which has three terms, and right-hand side

    y

    {displaystyle y}

    , consisting of just one term. The unknowns are x and y and the parameters are A, B, and C.

    An equation is analogous to a scale into which weights are placed. When equal weights of something (grain for example) are placed into the two pans, the two weights cause the scale to be in balance and are said to be equal. If a quantity of grain is removed from one pan of the balance, an equal amount of grain must be removed from the other pan to keep the scale in balance. Likewise, to keep an equation in balance, the same operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division must be performed on both sides of an equation for it to remain true.

    In geometry, equations are used to describe geometric figures. As the equations that are considered, such as implicit equations or parametric equations, have infinitely many solutions, the objective is now different: instead of giving the solutions explicitly or counting them, which is impossible, one uses equations for studying properties of figures. This is the starting idea of algebraic geometry, an important area of mathematics.

    Algebra studies two main families of equations: polynomial equations and, among them, the special case of linear equations. When there is only one variable, polynomial equations have the form P(x) = 0, where P is a polynomial, and linear equations have the form ax + b = 0, where a and b are parameters. To solve equations from either family, one uses algorithmic or geometric techniques that originate from linear algebra or mathematical analysis. Algebra also studies Diophantine equations where the coefficients and solutions are integers. The techniques used are different and come from number theory. These equations are difficult in general; one often searches just to find the existence or absence of a solution, and, if they exist, to count the number of solutions.

    Differential equations are equations that involve one or more functions and their derivatives. They are solved by finding an expression for the function that does not involve derivatives. Differential equations are used to model processes that involve the rates of change of the variable, and are used in areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, and economics.

    The “=” symbol, which appears in every equation, was invented in 1557 by Robert Recorde, who considered that nothing could be more equal than parallel straight lines with the same length.

Wikipedia
  • Function (noun)

    What something does or is used for.

    “aim|intention|purpose|role|use”

  • Function (noun)

    A professional or official position.

    “occupation|office|part|role”

  • Function (noun)

    An official or social occasion.

    “affair|occasion|social occasion|social function”

  • Function (noun)

    A relation where one thing is dependent on another for its existence, value, or significance.

  • Function (noun)

    A relation in which each element of the domain is associated with exactly one element of the codomain.

    “map|mapping|mathematical function|operator|transformation”

    “relation”

  • Function (noun)

    A routine that receives zero or more arguments and may return a result.

    “procedure|routine|subprogram|subroutine|func|funct”

  • Function (noun)

    The physiological activity of an organ or body part.

  • Function (noun)

    The characteristic behavior of a chemical compound.

  • Function (noun)

    The role of a social practice in the continued existence of the group.

  • Function (verb)

    To have a function.

    “officiate|serve”

  • Function (verb)

    To carry out a function; to be in action.

    “go|operate|run|work”

    “malfunction”

  • Equation (noun)

    The act or process of equating two or more things, or the state of those things being equal (that is, identical).

  • Equation (noun)

    An assertion that two expressions are equal, expressed by writing the two expressions separated by an equal sign; from which one is to determine a particular quantity.

  • Equation (noun)

    A small correction to observed values to remove the effects of systematic errors in an observation.

Wiktionary
  • Function (noun)

    an activity that is natural to or the purpose of a person or thing

    “bridges perform the function of providing access across water”

    “bodily functions”

  • Function (noun)

    practical use or purpose in design

    “building designs that prioritize style over function”

  • Function (noun)

    a basic task of a computer, especially one that corresponds to a single instruction from the user.

  • Function (noun)

    a relation or expression involving one or more variables

    “the function (bx + c)”

  • Function (noun)

    a variable quantity regarded in relation to one or more other variables in terms of which it may be expressed or on which its value depends

    “the magnetic field has varied as a function of time”

  • Function (noun)

    a functional group

    “the carboxyl group was replaced by functions that included tetrazolyl-, sulphonyl-, and phosphoryl-“

  • Function (noun)

    a thing dependent on another factor or factors

    “class shame is a function of social power”

  • Function (noun)

    a large or formal social event or ceremony

    “he was obliged to attend party functions”

  • Function (verb)

    work or operate in a proper or particular way

    “her liver is functioning normally”

  • Function (verb)

    fulfil the purpose or task of (a specified thing)

    “the museum intends to function as an educational and study centre”

Oxford Dictionary

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