After vs. Post

By Jaxson

  • After (adverb)

    Behind; later in time; following.

    “They lived happily ever after.”

    “I left the room, and the dog bounded after.”

  • After (preposition)

    Subsequently to; following in time; later than.

    “We had a few beers after the game.”

    “The time is quarter after eight.”

    “The Cold War began shortly after the Second World War.”

  • After (preposition)

    Behind.

    “He will leave a trail of destruction after him.”

  • After (preposition)

    In pursuit of, seeking.

    “He’s after a job; run after him; inquire after her health.”

  • After (preposition)

    In allusion to, in imitation of; following or referencing.

    “We named him after his grandfather; a painting after Leonardo da Vinci.”

  • After (preposition)

    Next in importance or rank.

    “The princess is next in line to the throne after the prince.”

  • After (preposition)

    As a result of.

    “After your bad behaviour, you will be punished.”

  • After (preposition)

    In spite of.

    “After all that has happened, he is still my friend.”

    “I can’t believe that, after all our advice against gambling, you walked into that casino!”

  • After (preposition)

    Used to indicate recent completion of an activity

    “I was after finishing my dinner when there was a knock on the door.”

  • After (preposition)

    According to an author or text.

  • After (preposition)

    Denoting the aim or object; concerning; in relation to.

    “to look after workmen; to enquire after a friend; to thirst after righteousness”

  • After (preposition)

    According to the direction and influence of; in proportion to; befitting.

  • After (conjunction)

    Signifies that the action of the clause it starts takes place before the action of the other clause.

    “I went home after we had decided to call it a day.”

  • After (adjective)

    Later; second (of two); next, following, subsequent

  • After (adjective)

    At or towards the stern of a ship.

    “The after gun is mounted aft.”

    “The after gun is abaft the forward gun.”

  • Post (noun)

    A long dowel or plank protruding from the ground; a fencepost; a lightpost.

  • Post (noun)

    A stud; a two-by-four.

  • Post (noun)

    A pole in a battery.

  • Post (noun)

    A long, narrow piece inserted into a root canal to provide retention for a crown.

  • Post (noun)

    A prolonged final melody note, among moving harmony notes.

  • Post (noun)

    A printing paper size measuring 19.25 inches x 15.5 inches.

  • Post (noun)

    A goalpost.

  • Post (noun)

    The doorpost of a victualler’s shop or inn, on which were chalked the scores of customers; hence, a score; a debt.

  • Post (noun)

    Each of a series of men stationed at specific places along a postroad, with responsibility for relaying letters and dispatches of the monarch (and later others) along the route. 16th-17th c.

  • Post (noun)

    A station, or one of a series of stations, established for the refreshment and accommodation of travellers on some recognized route.

    “a stage or railway post”

  • Post (noun)

    A military base; the place at which a soldier or a body of troops is stationed; also, the troops at such a station.

  • Post (noun)

    Someone who travels express along a set route carrying letters and dispatches; a courier. from 16th c.

  • Post (noun)

    An organisation for delivering letters, parcels etc., or the service provided by such an organisation. from 17th c.

    “sent via post; parcel post”

  • Post (noun)

    A single delivery of letters; the letters or deliveries that make up a single batch delivered to one person or one address. from 17th c.

  • Post (noun)

    A message posted in an electronic or Internet forum. from 20th c.

  • Post (noun)

    A location on a basketball court near the basket.

  • Post (noun)

    A moderate to deep passing route in which a receiver runs 10-20 yards from the line of scrimmage straight down the field, then cuts toward the middle of the field (towards the facing goalposts) at a 45-degree angle.

    “Two of the receivers ran post patterns.”

  • Post (noun)

    Haste or speed, like that of a messenger or mail carrier.

  • Post (noun)

    One who has charge of a station, especially a postal station.

  • Post (noun)

    An assigned station; a guard post.

  • Post (noun)

    An appointed position in an organization, job.

  • Post (noun)

    Post-production.

  • Post (verb)

    To hang (a notice) in a conspicuous manner for general review.

    “Post no bills.”

  • Post (verb)

    To hold up to public blame or reproach; to advertise opprobriously; to denounce by public proclamation.

    “to post someone for cowardice”

  • Post (verb)

    To carry (an account) from the journal to the ledger.

  • Post (verb)

    To inform; to give the news to; to make acquainted with the details of a subject; often with up.

  • Post (verb)

    To pay (a blind).

    “Since Jim was new to the game, he had to post $4 in order to receive a hand.”

  • Post (verb)

    To put content online, usually through a publicly accessible mean, such as a video channel, gallery, message board, blog etc.

  • Post (verb)

    To travel with relays of horses; to travel by post horses, originally as a courier. from 16th c.

  • Post (verb)

    To travel quickly; to hurry. from 16th c.

  • Post (verb)

    To send (an item of mail etc.) through the postal service. from 19th c.

    “Mail items posted before 7.00pm within the Central Business District and before 5.00pm outside the Central Business District will be delivered the next working day.”

  • Post (verb)

    To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the horse, especially in trotting. from 19th c.

  • Post (verb)

    To publish (a message) to a newsgroup, forum, blog, etc. from 20th c.

    “I couldn’t figure it out, so I posted a question on the mailing list.”

  • Post (verb)

    To enter (a name) on a list, as for service, promotion, etc.

  • Post (verb)

    To assign to a station; to set; to place.

    “Post a sentinel in front of the door.”

  • Post (adverb)

    With the post, on post-horses; express, with speed, quickly

  • Post (adverb)

    Sent via the postal service.

  • Post (preposition)

    After; especially after a significant event that has long-term ramifications.

Wiktionary
  • After (preposition)

    in the time following (an event or another period of time)

    “after a while he returned”

    “he’d gone out with his secretary for an after-work drink”

    “shortly after their marriage they moved to Colorado”

  • After (preposition)

    in phrases indicating something happening continuously or repeatedly

    “day after day we kept studying”

  • After (preposition)

    past (used in specifying a time)

    “I strolled in about ten minutes after two”

  • After (preposition)

    during the time following the departure or action of

    “visitors will be required to clean up after their dogs”

    “I tend to just tidy up after myself rather than doing a full clean all at once”

  • After (preposition)

    behind

    “she went out, shutting the door after her”

  • After (preposition)

    (with reference to looking or speaking) in the direction of someone who is moving further away

    “she stared after him”

  • After (preposition)

    in pursuit or quest of

    “chasing after something you can’t have”

  • After (preposition)

    next to and following in order or importance

    “in their order of priorities health comes after housing”

  • After (preposition)

    in allusion to (someone or something with the same or a related name)

    “they named her Pauline, after Barbara’s mother”

  • After (preposition)

    in imitation of

    “a drawing after Millet’s The Reapers”

  • After (conjunction)

    during the period of time following (an event)

    “Duke Frederick died soon after”

    “bath time ended in a flood after the taps were left running”

  • After (adverb)

    during the period of time following (an event)

    “Duke Frederick died soon after”

    “bath time ended in a flood after the taps were left running”

  • After (adjective)

    later

    “he was sorry in after years”

  • After (adjective)

    nearer the stern of a ship

    “the after cabin”

  • Post (noun)

    a long, sturdy piece of timber or metal set upright in the ground and used as a support or marker

    “follow the blue posts until the track meets a road”

  • Post (noun)

    a goalpost

    “Robertson, at the near post, headed wide”

  • Post (noun)

    a starting post or winning post.

  • Post (noun)

    a piece of writing, image, or other item of content published online, typically on a blog or social media website or application

    “in a recent post, he cautioned investors to be wary of these predictions”

  • Post (noun)

    the official service or system that delivers letters and parcels

    “the tickets are in the post”

    “winners will be notified by post”

  • Post (noun)

    letters and parcels delivered

    “she was opening her post”

  • Post (noun)

    a single collection or delivery of mail

    “entries must be received no later than first post on 14 June”

  • Post (noun)

    used in names of newspapers

    “the Washington Post”

  • Post (noun)

    each of a series of couriers who carried mail on horseback between fixed stages.

  • Post (noun)

    a person or vehicle that carries mail.

  • Post (noun)

    a position of paid employment; a job

    “he resigned from the post of Foreign Minister”

    “a teaching post”

  • Post (noun)

    a place where someone is on duty or where a particular activity is carried out

    “a customs post”

    “a shift worker asleep at his post”

  • Post (noun)

    a place where a soldier or police officer is stationed or which they patrol

    “he gave the men orders not to leave their posts”

  • Post (noun)

    a force stationed at a permanent position or camp; a garrison.

  • Post (noun)

    a local group in an organization of military veterans.

  • Post (noun)

    the status or rank of full-grade captain in the Royal Navy

    “Captain Miller was made post in 1796”

  • Post (verb)

    display (a notice) in a public place

    “a curt notice had been posted on the door”

  • Post (verb)

    put notices on or in

    “we have posted all the bars”

  • Post (verb)

    announce or publish (something, especially a financial result)

    “the company posted a ¬£460,000 loss”

  • Post (verb)

    publish the name of (a member of the armed forces) as missing or dead

    “a whole troop had been posted missing”

  • Post (verb)

    publish (a piece of writing, image, or other item of content) online, typically on a blog or social media website or application

    “the list was promptly posted all over the Internet”

    “I’ll post an article next week revealing the results of the poll”

    “she posted a photo of herself with the singer on Twitter”

    “the company posted the news on its blog yesterday”

  • Post (verb)

    (of a player or team) achieve or record (a particular score or result)

    “Smith and Lamb posted a century partnership”

  • Post (verb)

    send (a letter or parcel) via the postal system

    “post off your order form today”

    “I’ve just been to post a letter”

  • Post (verb)

    (in bookkeeping) enter (an item) in a ledger

    “post the transaction in the second column”

    “initial records kept in day books are periodically posted to accounts”

  • Post (verb)

    complete (a ledger) by entering items.

  • Post (verb)

    travel with relays of horses

    “we posted in an open carriage”

  • Post (verb)

    travel with haste; hurry

    “he comes posting up the street”

  • Post (verb)

    send (someone) to a place to take up an appointment

    “he was posted to Washington as military attach√©”

  • Post (verb)

    station (someone, especially a soldier or police officer) in a particular place

    “a guard was posted at the entrance”

  • Post (adverb)

    with haste

    “come now, come post”

  • Post (preposition)

    subsequent to; after

    “American poetry post the 1950s hasn’t had the same impact”

Oxford Dictionary
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